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Te Pūrakau o Te Makaro

Te Papatipu Matihiko – Culture and Digital Innovation Nestled at the heart of Te Wairoa’s river sits Te Makaro, a digital learning space with a history as rich, deep and diverse as the waters that flow past their doors. From Kōhanga to Pā Tuwatawata: The space once served as a Kōhanga, a nesting site for Makaro, later becoming a Pā Tuwatawata, a fighting Pā. Adjacent to this was another Pā, Te Waihirere. There, the Makiekie stream flows into the Wairoa river, known for its connection to the waka Takitimu and now Takitmu marae. Further along the river stood another Pā, that of Pitiera Kopu. A Place of Grounding and Growth: Whilst the building was originally part of the Wairoa College Home Economics block in the 1960s, it found its way to where it sits now in 2007. Local Taiao advocate, Arna Galvan was the original purchaser and transformed the building

Uncovering Achievements: An insight into the previous year at Te Papatipu Matihiko’s Digital Hubs

  At the heart of Te Papatipu Matihiko’s (TPM) Digital Hub lies a commitment to empowering educational outcomes. Through a nurturing environment and innovative approaches to learning, our tauira have experienced newfound confidence, skill development, and a positive attitude towards education. By engaging ākonga who were previously disengaged or disconnected from learning, TPM has reinvented the wheel of education, making it relevant and accessible to all. Individualised attention to hauora needs has further enhanced student wellbeing and focus, laying a solid foundation for lifelong learning. The impact of TPM’s Digital Hubs is best exemplified through inspiring success stories. From hesitant kōtiro blossoming into confident contenders to school leavers and dropouts finding their passion and purpose, the Digital Hubs have become a catalyst for personal and academic growth. Whether it’s guiding aspiring artists towards prestigious design schools or supporting students in pursuing their career aspirations, TPM’s commitment to individualised support shines

A Journey Down Under: An Unforgettable Experience at SXSW Sydney

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhLboa3U9fI Introduction After a seamless three and a half hours in the air from Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland) to Te Whenua Moemoeā (Australia), I found myself amidst the vibrant atmosphere of Sydney, just a stone’s throw away from the iconic Opera House. The reason for this trans-Tasman journey? The inaugural South by Southwest (SXSW) in Sydney, a convergence of film, interactive media, and music festivals that typically calls Austin, Texas home. Discovering SXSW For those unacquainted with SXSW, it’s an annual gathering that draws participants from diverse creative industries, creating a kaleidoscope of panels, presenters, celebrity appearances, and musical performances over five days. This year, it wasn’t just about the event, it was about bringing Te Ao Māori and the richness of indigenous cultures to the forefront at the AotearoaNzHouse. Embracing Indigenous Roots at AotearoaNzHouse The AotearoaNzHouse proved to be a home away from home, a haven for indigenous creatives, businessmen,

Mātauranga Māori Practitioners collaborate to create opportunities

Play Video Te Papatipu Matihiko (TPM), is an inspired collective of tūturu Māori organisations, made up of mātauranga Māori practitioners, innovators and educators who see what doesn’t work in mainstream education and created a positive alternative to those who don’t fit the one size fits all. Providing a culturally responsive and holistic approach to learning in a digital context. Integrating technology into education and finding innovative ways to deliver hands-on experiences which allow people to explore the digital space. “Our aspirations are to reignite a love for learning and life, support in the journey of self-identity and to prepare our ākonga for greatness. While the focus is on digital, Mātauranga Māori is the foundation of our kaupapa. It’s a Māori pedagogy because it’s revolutionary focused and we’re optimising learning,” explains Henry Lawton, Chair of Te Papatipu Matihiko. 78% of rangatahi play video games online and esports is a fantastic example

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